Landscape

THE 2020 AIPP EPSON STATE LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

THE WINNER RECEIVES A CERTIFICATE, TROPHY AND $250 CASH.


The Landscape Category is for CORRECTIVE & CREATIVE EDIT images (see page 12 - 13).


This category is intended for landscape images that depict the natural or urban environment. Entries may be literal or interpretative or aerial. Judges in this category are asked to consider both traditional and contemporary values, photographic technique, print quality, composition and light.

The Landscape category will be judged in two sections:

Landscape Corrective Edit

Landscape Creative Edit

The category is judged in two sections to assist the judges in their assessment; however, there is only one award. In order to win The 2020 AIPP Epson State Landscape Photographer of the Year, an entrant must have entered the maximum of four prints into the category.


CATEGORY RULES AND REQUIREMENTS

In addition to the general rules stipulated on pages 11-13:

  • Entries into this category may be commissioned or self-commissioned.
  • Photographs must depict or imply the natural or human/urban environment.
  • Polyptychs (diptychs, triptychs, etc.) are permitted in both sections, however, entries into
  • Landscape Corrective Edit must have a maximum of six images per matted print.
  • Captioning is OPTIONAL. A caption of up to 50 words may be provided to assist the judges in assessing your entry (see the captioning guidelines below). Entrants, for example, may wish to include a title and/or an explanation of the purpose, meaning or narrative relating to the image. Technical information may also be provided for images of a specialist nature.


IMAGE CAPTIONS

A caption should provide the basic information needed to understand a photograph and its context. It should primarily cover the Who-What-Where-When and sometimes Why (‘the five Ws’) of the picture’s content. Captions should consist of one or two short factual sentences covering the five Ws as succinctly as possible. Entrants are advised to go easy on the use of adjectives and adverbs as they can influence the way judges assess an image, and not always in a good way. There is no need to state what can clearly be seen, but if needed a sentence that provides pertinent context may be added to fully explain the image.